"The question to ask is, 'How do I determine, in 30 to 60 minutes, if this person can do the work we need..'" - ACM Queue

The true goal of any interview is for both parties—the interviewer and interviewee—to work out whether the person can do the work and is a good fit with the rest of the group. There are many brilliant programmers out there whom I would never hire because the detrimental impact of their character defects on the rest of the team would outweigh their abilities as coders. The question to ask is, "How do I determine, in 30 to 60 minutes, if this person can do the work we need, and in a way that I can put up with him or her for 10 hours a day, five days a week, and possibly for years on end?" That's a lot to ask of such a short meeting.

"It's harder to read code than to write it." - Joel Spolsky

There's a subtle reason that programmers always want to throw away the code and start over. The reason is that they think the old code is a mess. And here is the interesting observation: they are probably wrong. The reason that they think the old code is a mess is because of a cardinal, fundamental law of programming:

It’s harder to read code than to write it.

This is why code reuse is so hard. This is why everybody on your team has a different function they like to use for splitting strings into arrays of strings. They write their own function because it's easier and more fun than figuring out how the old function works.

Highly recommend you read the entire article at joelonsoftware.com

"A discipline like Extreme Programming requires a radical upgrade in both technical and social skills..." ☛ Kent Beck

A discipline like Extreme Programming requires a radical upgrade in both technical and social skills, especially for programmers. It requires become transparent, accountable, and responsible. Mostly I see people trying to get different results with basically the same techniques they always used, just rearranged slightly.

SEC to require "Python" code as part of ASSET-BACKED SECURITIES filing, unit tests to follow!

We are proposing to require the filing of a computer program (the “waterfall computer program,” as defined in the proposed rule) of the contractual cash flow provisions of the securities in the form of downloadable source code in Python, a commonly used computer programming language that is open source and interpretive. The computer program would be tagged in XML and required to be filed with the Commission as an exhibit. Under our proposal, the filed source code for the computer program, when downloaded and run (by loading it into an open “Python” session on the investor’s computer), would be required to allow the user to programmatically input information from the asset data file that we are proposing to require as described above. We believe that, with the waterfall computer program and the asset data file, investors would be better able to conduct their own evaluations of ABS and may be less likely to be dependent on the opinions of credit rating agencies.
via sec.gov

Hmmm.... sounds like the SEC want's unit tests the users can run. I guess they don't trust the ratings agencies.