"...trying to avoid failure by out-thinking it—dooms you to fail..."- from “Creativity, Inc.”


July 30, 2015
Chapter 6: Fear and Failure

The better, more subtle interpretation is that failure is a manifestation of learning and exploration. If you aren’t experiencing failure, then you are making a far worse mistake: You are being driven by the desire to avoid it. And, for leaders especially, this strategy—trying to avoid failure by out-thinking it—dooms you to fail. As Andrew puts it, “Moving things forward allows the team you are leading to feel like, ‘Oh, I’m on a boat that is actually going towards land.’ As opposed to having a leader who says, ‘I’m still not sure. I’m going to look at the map a little bit more, and we’re just going to float here, and all of you stop rowing until I figure this out.’ And then weeks go by, and morale plummets, and failure becomes self-fulfilling. People begin to treat the captain with doubt and trepidation. Even if their doubts aren’t fully justified, you’ve become what they see you as because of your inability to move.”

All Excerpts From

‘You better think really hard about where you put your fingers on the guitar neck before you strum, because you only get to strum once, and that’s it'- from “Creativity, Inc.”


July 30, 2015
Chapter 6: Fear and Failure

Left to their own devices, most people don’t want to fail. But Andrew Stanton isn’t most people. As I’ve mentioned, he’s known around Pixar for repeating the phrases “fail early and fail fast” and “be wrong as fast as you can.” He thinks of failure like learning to ride a bike; it isn’t conceivable that you would learn to do this without making mistakes—without toppling over a few times. “Get a bike that’s as low to the ground as you can find, put on elbow and knee pads so you’re not afraid of falling, and go,” he says. If you apply this mindset to everything new you attempt, you can begin to subvert the negative connotation associated with making mistakes. Says Andrew: “You wouldn’t say to somebody who is first learning to play the guitar, ‘You better think really hard about where you put your fingers on the guitar neck before you strum, because you only get to strum once, and that’s it. And if you get that wrong, we’re going to move on.’ That’s no way to learn, is it?”

All Excerpts From

Ed Catmull & Amy Wallace. “Creativity, Inc.” Random House, 2014-04-08. iBooks.
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"... we are going to covet Chubb’s claims capability and service, which is simply renowned..." - Evan Greenberg

ACE may have been focused a little more on international. Chubb has capabilities in product that is very old and very deep. And so frankly, we actually see the product integration as very complementary and quite comfortable. For agents and brokers, they want to know that we are going to behave in the similar way. They want to know that we are going to covet Chubb’s claims capability and service, which is simply renowned. And I can guarantee you we are going to do that. And they will be leading those efforts.
- Evan Greenberg - ACE Q2 2015 Results - Earnings Call Transcript

"...this is going to be the most high class, quality P&C company in the world..." - Evan Greenberg

When you put these two companies together, everybody keeps talking about size. The size that the two of us will be. Sure, and when you look at that investor deck, that’s also true. But the more important is to me, and I don’t think this is hyperbole; this is going to be the most high class, quality P&C company in the world. Yes, we are going to be one of the top global players in the world. We are. But the quality, we will out-class everyone, if we do this right.
- Evan Greenberg - ACE Employee Call Transcript 07.02.15